Chapter 170

San Luis Obispo, CA

February 18, 2018 Meeting

Outside on the nearby tie down area we met up with CHP officers Robert Shannon and Shannon Slover and their aircraft, respectively Cessna T206 and helicopter Airbus (AirStar) H125.

After introductions they briefly outlined some of the CHP Air Division missions, their work roles and some of their experiences. Both men spoke about activities ranging from rescuing stranded hikers, car and individual pursuits, and some medivac operations.

They extensively described how they respond to ELT or other location indicators. Although much of their activities is with aerial patrolling and being available to respond to calls they receive.

Thereafter it was question and answer time. When asked why they would come out to KSBP when they could be enjoying a Sunday at home they said they always look for the chance to improve their flight proficiency, and because they like to fly.

Both men had early interests about flying and especially if it was as a job, and for the CHP. They added that in order to do that candidates must have a college degree and complete CHP Academy training. There they acquired knowledge of applicable law; undergo weapon and defensive training and other skills for ground patrol duties. After two years as ground patrol officers, candidates can apply for the Air Division. They must have a private pilot license, instrument and commercial ratings and at least 300 hours as pilot in command time. They also must pass FAA and CHP requirements.

We were also told about their aircraft. Each have great instrumentation and lots of radio and other equipment. Both aircraft have excellent cameras; the helicopter has an infra-red camera.

Both aircraft generally fly low, about 1000 agl and usually are set up for about a two hour flight, but with full fuel that can be extended. It was mentioned that the helicopter burns 45 gal per hr. Also mentioned were some excessive wind limitations and turbulent flight characteristics.

Officer Slover opened the helicopter to show its interior and demonstrated the hoist mechanism and how even an unassisted pilot can operate the hoist mechanism. The helicopter has a public announcement speaker and a powerful search light.

This reporter because of poor hearing, slow penmanship and windy conditions was unable to fully record the very interesting informative conversation. However, those in attendance were rewarded and well treated.

Following is a little bit about the CHP Office of Air Operations structure, programs and aircraft. Based in Sacramento, the CHP manages the Air Operations Program, which provides a valuable service to the public, to allied agency partners, and to CHP ground patrol units. Its 15 helicopters and 15 airplanes are multi-mission assets, well equipped to work in a number of areas such as search and rescue, advanced life support, and law enforcement. Although these aircrafts are outfitted with specialized equipment such as rescue hoists, medical gear, and cameras the most important assets are the exceptional pilots and flight officers.

Over 150 crewmembers fly out of eight air units located throughout the state. Crew members are trained professionals that begin their careers as patrol officers. Their skills enable them to complete a multitude of missions including rescues, providing advanced life support to injured persons, and managing complex law enforcement occurrences.

Within Air Operations, there is a Chief Helicopter Pilot and Chief Airplane Pilot responsible for establishing pilot eligibility, overseeing pilot training, and annual pilot valuations. They insure that pilots meet FAA and departmental currency and medical requirements. They also assess operational issues, requests for modifications, and developing specifications for and acquiring aircraft and equipment. They are responsible for matters relating to rescue operations, and necessary training programs.

There is an Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Coordinator who acts as a liaison between the Department and the Emergency Medical Services Authority. The coordinator also assists Commanders and aerial supervisors with the management of paramedic services and placement of personnel into EMT-P training courses.

Helicopter and Airplane Maintenance Coordinators are responsible for the oversight of the maintenance programs. The Safety Coordinator assumes responsibility for all matters relating to safety. The Chief Flight Officer Coordinator assumes responsibility for all matters relating to flight officers. The Accreditation Program Manager is responsible for the accreditation of the Air Operations Program.

Helicopter and Airplane Maintenance Coordinators are responsible for the oversight of the maintenance programs. The Safety Coordinator assumes responsibility for all matters relating to safety. The Chief Flight Officer Coordinator assumes responsibility for all matters relating to flight officers.

The primary aircraft in the CHP fleet are Cessna T206 Stationairs and Airbus (AirStar) H125 helicopters (these formerly known as AS350 Eurocopters). A few Bell helicopters and a Cessna 182 round out the fleet. The Accreditation Program Manager is responsible for the accreditation of the Air Operations Program.

The primary aircraft in the CHP fleet are Cessna T206 Stationairs and Airbus (AirStar) H125 helicopters (these formerly known as AS350 Eurocopters). A few Bell helicopters and a Cessna 182 round out the fleet.

AirStar H125 Specifications: Capacity – 1 pilot, 3- 4 passengers - Powerplant 1 Turbomeca Arriel 2D (845 shp take off power) - Cruise 137 kts - Climb rate 1,773 fpm - Vne 155 kt - Empty wt 2,816 lbs - Useful load 2,409 lbs - Full fuel 143 gal - Max (no reserve) range 336 nm.

Cessna T205H Stationaire Specifications: Capacity 1 pilot, 4-5 passengers – 1 Lycoming TSIO 540 Asia 310 hp - Wing span 36’ - Length 28’3” - Ht 9’4” - Wing area 174 sq ft - Wing loading 25.5 lb/sq ft – Gross wt 3600 lbs – Empty wt 2362 lbs – Useful load 1255 lbs - Payload full fuel 733 lbs - Cruise at 75% 150 kts - Best rate of climb 1050 ft- Vso 54 kt - Take off distance 910ft - Landing 735 ft - Fuel 87 gal - Range at 75% 570 nm - Fuel burn 19 gal/hr - Ceiling 27,000 ft. 

The primary aircraft in the CHP fleet are Cessna T206 Stationairs and Airbus (AirStar) H125 helicopters (these formerly known as AS350 Eurocopters). A few Bell helicopters and a Cessna 182 round out the fleet.

 

January 21, 2018 Meeting

Many Waco Cabin Biplanes that were originally sold as civilian aircraft were impressed into military service in World War II. The United States Army Air Forces classified them regardless of type as Waco C-72s, with type letters identifying specific models. They were used as coastal patrols and one is credited with sinking a submarine off of the Texas coast. A 1933 Waco UIC was at Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941, and survived because it was out on a training flight that Sunday. Waco produced over 600 of its UPF-7 open biplanes and 21 VKS7F cabin biplanes for the Civilian Pilot Training Program, which supplemented the output for military training aircraft. These “F7s” are much desired in the Antique Aviation community today because of their wide landing gear and reliable Continental W670 engine.
Waco civilian designations used letters to describe the various models of the aircraft. The first letter is the engine used. Each engine make and size was given an arbitrary letter code. The second letter designated the wing planform, and the third letter the general series. Example would be the UPF-7. U= engine, Continental W670. P=Wings, Clark Y with a 40 gallon fuel tanks in the center section with the back of the center section cut out so the front seat passenger could exit the airplane if necessary during acrobatics. The F-7 code was the seventh iteration of the open cockpit tandem airplane. The first coding system was changed in 1929 with several letters reassigned, and later with the introduction of the Custom Cabin series, the third letter 'C' was initially replaced with C-S (Cabin-Standard) and finally S. The numeral suffix represents the first year of production if it is 6 or higher (6=1936), or a sub type if 2 or less. Thus EGC-7 is a Wright R-760-E2 (350 hp engine), cabin biplane airframe, custom cabin model first manufactured in 1937.
Many Waco Cabin Biplanes that were originally sold as civilian aircraft were impressed into military service in World War II. The United States Army Air Forces classified them regardless of type as Waco C-72s, with type letters identifying specific models. They were used as coastal patrols and one is credited with sinking a submarine off of the Texas coast. A 1933 Waco UIC was at Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941, and survived because it was out on a training flight that Sunday. Waco produced over 600 of its UPF-7 open biplanes and 21 VKS7F cabin biplanes for the Civilian Pilot Training Program, which supplemented the output for military training aircraft. These “F7s” are much desired in the Antique Aviation community today because of their wide landing gear and reliable Continental W670 engine.
Waco civilian designations used letters to describe the various models of the aircraft. The first letter is the engine used. Each engine make and size was given an arbitrary letter code. The second letter designated the wing planform, and the third letter the general series. Example would be the UPF-7. U= engine, Continental W670. P=Wings, Clark Y with a 40 gallon fuel tanks in the center section with the back of the center section cut out so the front seat passenger could exit the airplane if necessary during acrobatics. The F-7 code was the seventh iteration of the open cockpit tandem airplane. The first coding system was changed in 1929 with several letters reassigned, and later with the introduction of the Custom Cabin series, the third letter 'C' was initially replaced with C-S (Cabin-Standard) and finally S. The numeral suffix represents the first year of production if it is 6 or higher (6=1936), or a sub type if 2 or less. Thus EGC-7 is a Wright R-760-E2 (350 hp engine), cabin biplane airframe, custom cabin model first manufactured in 1937.
/var/folders/_8/bfyy6m6x6g9gymt1jlzqy44r0000gp/T/com.apple.Preview/com.apple.Preview.PasteboardItems/Feb 2018 Newsletter (dragged).pdf

 

 

 

 

 

The program theme was about airplane annuals with the anticipation that some aircraft owners would relate their pro or con experiences with annual. To preface the discussion the following is a Very Brief Overview about Annual Inspections –The program theme was about airplane annuals with the anticipation that some aircraft owners would relate their pro or con experiences with annual. To preface the discussion the following is a Very Brief Overview about Annual Inspections –The program theme was about airplane annuals with the anticipation that some aircraft owners would relate their pro or con experiences with annual. To preface the discussion the following is a Very Brief Overview about Annual Inspections –The program theme was about airplane annuals with the anticipation that some aircraft owners would relate their pro or con experiences with annual. To preface the discussion the following is a Very Brief Overview about Annual Inspections –


According to the FAA, every airplane is required to undergo an annual inspection: "no person may operate an aircraft unless, within the preceding 12 calendar months, it has had an annual inspection and has been approved for return to service by a person authorized by FAR 43.7." Most general aviation aircraft require an annual inspection. Inspection requirements differ with the various uses of aircraft.

Annual Inspection (FAR 91.409)
The annual must be completed and properly endorsed by a mechanic with an inspection authorization (IA) within the preceding 12 calendar months.

 The program theme was about airplane annuals with the anticipation that some aircraft owners would relate their pro or con experiences with annual. To preface the discussion the following is a Very Brief Overview about Annual Inspections

According to the FAA, every airplane is required to undergo an annual inspection: "no person may operate an aircraft unless, within the preceding 12 calendar months, it has had an annual inspection and has been approved for return to service by a person authorized by FAR 43.7." Most general aviation aircraft require an annual inspection. Inspection requirements differ with the various uses of aircraft.

Annual Inspection (FAR 91.409)
The annual must be completed and properly endorsed by a mechanic with an inspection authorization (IA) within the preceding 12 calendar months.

100-Hour Inspection (FAR 91.409)
The 100-hour inspection is required for aircraft: that carries any person (other than a crew member) for hire; or is provided by any person giving flight instruction for hire.
The phrase "for hire" refers to the person, not the aircraft.

Items Checked During Inspections (FAR 43)

According to the FAA, every airplane is required to undergo an annual inspection: "no person may operate an aircraft unless, within the preceding 12 calendar months, it has had an annual inspection and has been approved for return to service by a person authorized by FAR 43.7." Most general aviation aircraft require an annual inspection. Inspection requirements differ with the various uses of aircraft.

Annual Inspection (FAR 91.409) The annual must be completed and properly endorsed by a mechanic with an inspection authorization (IA) within the preceding 12 calendar months.

The annual must be completed and properly endorsed by a mechanic with an inspection authorization (IA) within the preceding 12 calendar months 

100-Hour Inspection (FAR 91.409) The 100-hour inspection is required for aircraft: that carries any person (other than a crew member) for hire; or is provided by any person giving flight instruction for hire.The phrase "for hire" refers to the person, not the aircraft.

Items Checked During Inspections (FAR 43) The aircraft's static system, altimeter, and automatic altitude-reporting (Mode C) system must have been inspected and tested in the preceding 24 calendar months before flying IFR in controlled airspace. FAR 43 Appendix E, Altimeter System Test and Inspection, lists the items that must be checked. 

Transponders (FAR 91.413) The transponder must be inspected every 24 calendar months. Emergency Locater Transmitter (FAR 91.207) Installed ELT's must be inspected within 12 calendar months after the last inspection for proper installation, battery corrosion, operation of the controls/crash sensor, and sufficient signal strength. While this check is not necessarily required to be accomplished during the annual inspection, that would be a convenient time. For members wanting annual inspection details – search the internet for airplane annual. 

Jim Buenrostro’s Cessna 172

In his words, what happened was: “I took my 1958 C-172 in for its annual, and the mechanics spotted a couple of popped/missing rivets on the right door post. They told me that this is often an indication of surface corrosion between layers of metal. When they opened up the sheet metal they found more corrosion than expected which warranted further investigation. The roof sheet-metal was opened up only to find additional corrosion on the spar carry- through. This is the component that carries the loads of the wings through the cabin, connecting the wings together.

The corrosion on the spar carry-through was observed to be greater than just cleaning, and painting would allow. The SLO shop was not equipped to make the kind of repairs needed, and so I contacted a shop in Northern California that is set up to does that kind of major work. (The spar carry-through is a component that the whole plane is defendant on for structural strength and to be replaced, needs the whole plane placed in a jig for integrity.)

While the spar carry-through was being replaced, they found additional corrosion in the wing connector blocks. These are how the wings are attached to the airplane. This corrosion was inter-granular corrosion. Not just the typical surface corrosion that most of us are familiar with. It comes from a contaminate that was present in the billet of aluminum when it was cast. It looks like a big blister on the aluminum. There is no way to inspect that component of the airplane without taking the roof off of the airplane. To my knowledge there is no AD or advisory of this problem even though a failure of this component would mean catastrophic loss of a wing.

The spar carry-through was replaced and new connector blocks were installed. New roof sheet-metal was installed after all parts were corrosion treated, primed, and painted. The wings were re-installed, and the plane was given a thorough annual and cleared to fly.”

Although this took a while and considerable cost the result was a safe airplane. His take home message: Annuals are hard to take medicine to make airplanes well and safe.

Another contributor was Barry Branin. The situation that he related was discovered during the annual of his Cessna 180 which was a cracked bulkhead in the tail cone. This was the bulkhead right under the fin in an area that is hard to inspect.

The shop said that they had discovered at least 6 others like this. The mechanic who worked on it discovered it because he was familiar with that airplane and he knew where to look.

Barry restated the message that it is important that the person doing the annual knows your airplane. His airplane is a 1965 Cessna with 3500 hours total time since new and he has owned it for over 30 years.

There was mentioned that some airplanes with fiber glass construction do need to be aware of delamination. David Fretwell, whose Lancair is made with carbon fiber believes corrosion is not a major concern. But, he added that if you build it, you probably know it best.

After some round table discussion about all the bad things that happen with airplanes another thought expressed was not to be afraid of used airplanes. Well maintained used airplanes although absent that “new smell” can be a good airplane and good value.

December 17, 2017 Meeting

Chapter member Barry Branin (also a Flabob Chapter 1 member) began his presentation about his Waco’s and Waco airplanes by indicating that several companies operated under the Waco name, the first company being the Weaver Aircraft Company, a firm founded by George E. Weaver, Clayton Bruckner, and Elwood Junkin in 1920 in Lorain and Medina, Ohio after they had already been collaborating for several years building airplanes of their own design. In the spring of 1923 this became the Advance Aircraft Company in Troy, Ohio, after the departure of Weaver. At some point it was changed from Advance Aircraft Company to Waco (Wah-co) Aircraft Company.

By the 1930s the company, known as Waco Aircraft was a leader in the design of wood and fabric aircraft with Waco aircraft being operated by public, private, and corporate owners in many countries. During World War II Waco was devoted entirely to war production. The small facility in Troy, Ohio had an active part in the Civilian Pilot Training program. In 1940 the Waco PT-14 (UPF-7)was approved for Secondary Training. At the peak, the small facility was building three PT-14s a day as well as maintaining the scheduled Cabin Waco production.

Waco engineers helped design the Troop glider that was used in the war. During World War II large numbers of military gliders were produced for the RAF and US Army Air Forces airborne operations, especially during the Normandy Invasion and “Operation Market Garden”. The Waco CG-4 was the most numerous of their glider designs to be produced. Waco built 1,607 gliders. Another 13,402 gliders were built by other companies who subcontracted under the Waco Aircraft Company. As an example Ford Motor Company built many thousand Waco gliders at its plant in Ypsilanti, Michigan.
Following the war Waco attempted to market a entirely new design but the postwar slump in the private aviation market and the high development costs of the aircraft forced Waco to withdraw from aircraft manufacturing. in June 1947 Waco ceased operations having suffered the fate of a number of general aviation companies when an anticipated boom in aviation following World War II failed to develop.
Waco established themselves as producers of reliable, rugged planes that were popular with travelling businessmen sport pilots, postal services and explorers, especially when after 1930 the company began producing closed-cabin biplane models in addition to open cockpit biplanes. The Waco name was extremely well represented in the U.S. civil aircraft registry between the wars, with more Waco’s registered than the aircraft of any other company.

Production types included open cockpit biplanes, cabin biplanes and cabin sesquiplanes (known by Waco as Custom Cabins) as well as numerous experimental types. These custom cabin airplanes had a smaller bottom wing. They were faster than the Standard cabin models. The last Custom cabin model was the SRE. It used a 450 hp Pratt and Whitney engine with a smooth cowl and would do 200 mph. During its twenty-eight year existence Waco produced sixty-two different aircraft models and led all its competitors in number of aircraft registered. The Waco 10 was the most produced airplane model; 1,623 were produced. Total production of all model Wacos is estimated at 6500.

Many Waco Cabin Biplanes that were originally sold as civilian aircraft were impressed into military service in World War II. The United States Army Air Forces classified them regardless of type as Waco C-72s, with type letters identifying specific models. They were used as coastal patrols and one is credited with sinking a submarine off of the Texas coast. A 1933 Waco UIC was at Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941, and survived because it was out on a training flight that Sunday. Waco produced over 600 of its UPF-7 open biplanes and 21 VKS7F cabin biplanes for the Civilian Pilot Training Program, which supplemented the output for military training aircraft. These “F7s” are much desired in the Antique Aviation community today because of their wide landing gear and reliable Continental W670 engine.
Waco civilian designations used letters to describe the various models of the aircraft. The first letter is the engine used. Each engine make and size was given an arbitrary letter code. The second letter designated the wing planform, and the third letter the general series. Example would be the UPF-7. U= engine, Continental W670. P=Wings, Clark Y with a 40 gallon fuel tanks in the center section with the back of the center section cut out so the front seat passenger could exit the airplane if necessary during acrobatics. The F-7 code was the seventh iteration of the open cockpit tandem airplane. The first coding system was changed in 1929 with several letters reassigned, and later with the introduction of the Custom Cabin series, the third letter 'C' was initially replaced with C-S (Cabin-Standard) and finally S. The numeral suffix represents the first year of production if it is 6 or higher (6=1936), or a sub type if 2 or less. Thus EGC-7 is a Wright R-760-E2 (350 hp engine), cabin biplane airframe, custom cabin model first manufactured in 1937.

Barry mentioned that Waco used several different engines and variations of those engines when manufacturing their airplanes. Initially the war surplus Curtiss OX-5 and the Liberty engines were used. These were soon abandoned for lighter weight air cooled radial engines. These air-cooled engines demonstrated their value when Charles Lindbergh flew the Atlantic behind an air-cooled Wright. When the Depression hit the country, smaller engines were introduced by Kinner, Warner, Wright and Continental. The first Continental radial was an A-70 (Q) which did not have overhead oiling. This was followed by the Continental R-670 (U). Other engines utilized were manufactured by 350 hp Wright (E), 125 hp Kinner (I) and 170 hp Jacobs (P), 245 hp Jacobs (Y), and 450 hp Pratt and Whitney (S). Waco made tandem, and side by side seating as well as cabin models. A few Waco N series airplanes were nose wheel and were produced during 1937-38.

Throughout the years of manufacturing airplanes modifications were made in engine make and horse power, airframe and accessories. A large number of survivors exist, with a large collections residing at the Historic Aircraft Restoration Museum at Dauster Field, Creve Coeur, near St Louis, and the Missouri and Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum in Hood River, Oregon.
The original Waco facility hangar in Troy, Ohio is now the headquarters of United Technologies Aerospace Systems - Landing Systems business unit. It manufactures wheels and brakes for aircraft. The Waco Air Museum (Wacoairmuseum.org) is located on Waco Field, a grass strip at the south edge of Troy, Ohio. The Museum has a collection of Wacos and the Aviation Learning Center.

Barry clearly has an intense interest in his Waco airplanes and has an extensive knowledge about Waco and models of Waco airplanes. He has a large library of drawings of Waco plans. Following his discussion and answering a number of questions the group walked over to Barry’s hangers to see both of his Waco’s.
As to his current project, Barry was looking for a challenge and found one in a 1932 model UBA. This airplane was one of the 22 side by side WACOs built. It was delivered with a removable top that was called the winter enclosure. His other Waco is a 1931 QCF-2. It is also beautiful and yearns to fly. Barry loaded us with numerous details and his experiences with both airplanes. He has a deep interest and knowledge about his and other Waco models and invites questions.
Chapter member Barry Branin (also a Flabob Chapter 1 member) began his presentation about his Waco’s and Waco airplanes by indicating that several companies operated under the Waco name, the first company being the Weaver Aircraft Company, a firm founded by George E. Weaver, Clayton Bruckner, and Elwood Junkin in 1920 in Lorain and Medina, Ohio after they had already been collaborating for several years building airplanes of their own design. In the spring of 1923 this became the Advance Aircraft Company in Troy, Ohio, after the departure of Weaver. At some point it was changed from Advance Aircraft Company to Waco (Wah-co) Aircraft Company.

By the 1930s the company, known as Waco Aircraft was a leader in the design of wood and fabric aircraft with Waco aircraft being operated by public, private, and corporate owners in many countries. During World War II Waco was devoted entirely to war production. The small facility in Troy, Ohio had an active part in the Civilian Pilot Training program. In 1940 the Waco PT-14 (UPF-7)was approved for Secondary Training. At the peak, the small facility was building three PT-14s a day as well as maintaining the scheduled Cabin Waco production.

Waco engineers helped design the Troop glider that was used in the war. During World War II large numbers of military gliders were produced for the RAF and US Army Air Forces airborne operations, especially during the Normandy Invasion and “Operation Market Garden”. The Waco CG-4 was the most numerous of their glider designs to be produced. Waco built 1,607 gliders. Another 13,402 gliders were built by other companies who subcontracted under the Waco Aircraft Company. As an example Ford Motor Company built many thousand Waco gliders at its plant in Ypsilanti, Michigan.
Following the war Waco attempted to market a entirely new design but the postwar slump in the private aviation market and the high development costs of the aircraft forced Waco to withdraw from aircraft manufacturing. in June 1947 Waco ceased operations having suffered the fate of a number of general aviation companies when an anticipated boom in aviation following World War II failed to develop.
Waco established themselves as producers of reliable, rugged planes that were popular with travelling businessmen sport pilots, postal services and explorers, especially when after 1930 the company began producing closed-cabin biplane models in addition to open cockpit biplanes. The Waco name was extremely well represented in the U.S. civil aircraft registry between the wars, with more Waco’s registered than the aircraft of any other company.

Production types included open cockpit biplanes, cabin biplanes and cabin sesquiplanes (known by Waco as Custom Cabins) as well as numerous experimental types. These custom cabin airplanes had a smaller bottom wing. They were faster than the Standard cabin models. The last Custom cabin model was the SRE. It used a 450 hp Pratt and Whitney engine with a smooth cowl and would do 200 mph. During its twenty-eight year existence Waco produced sixty-two different aircraft models and led all its competitors in number of aircraft registered. The Waco 10 was the most produced airplane model; 1,623 were produced. Total production of all model Wacos is estimated at 6500.

Many Waco Cabin Biplanes that were originally sold as civilian aircraft were impressed into military service in World War II. The United States Army Air Forces classified them regardless of type as Waco C-72s, with type letters identifying specific models. They were used as coastal patrols and one is credited with sinking a submarine off of the Texas coast. A 1933 Waco UIC was at Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941, and survived because it was out on a training flight that Sunday. Waco produced over 600 of its UPF-7 open biplanes and 21 VKS7F cabin biplanes for the Civilian Pilot Training Program, which supplemented the output for military training aircraft. These “F7s” are much desired in the Antique Aviation community today because of their wide landing gear and reliable Continental W670 engine.
Waco civilian designations used letters to describe the various models of the aircraft. The first letter is the engine used. Each engine make and size was given an arbitrary letter code. The second letter designated the wing planform, and the third letter the general series. Example would be the UPF-7. U= engine, Continental W670. P=Wings, Clark Y with a 40 gallon fuel tanks in the center section with the back of the center section cut out so the front seat passenger could exit the airplane if necessary during acrobatics. The F-7 code was the seventh iteration of the open cockpit tandem airplane. The first coding system was changed in 1929 with several letters reassigned, and later with the introduction of the Custom Cabin series, the third letter 'C' was initially replaced with C-S (Cabin-Standard) and finally S. The numeral suffix represents the first year of production if it is 6 or higher (6=1936), or a sub type if 2 or less. Thus EGC-7 is a Wright R-760-E2 (350 hp engine), cabin biplane airframe, custom cabin model first manufactured in 1937.

Barry mentioned that Waco used several different engines and variations of those engines when manufacturing their airplanes. Initially the war surplus Curtiss OX-5 and the Liberty engines were used. These were soon abandoned for lighter weight air cooled radial engines. These air-cooled engines demonstrated their value when Charles Lindbergh flew the Atlantic behind an air-cooled Wright. When the Depression hit the country, smaller engines were introduced by Kinner, Warner, Wright and Continental. The first Continental radial was an A-70 (Q) which did not have overhead oiling. This was followed by the Continental R-670 (U). Other engines utilized were manufactured by 350 hp Wright (E), 125 hp Kinner (I) and 170 hp Jacobs (P), 245 hp Jacobs (Y), and 450 hp Pratt and Whitney (S). Waco made tandem, and side by side seating as well as cabin models. A few Waco N series airplanes were nose wheel and were produced during 1937-38.

Throughout the years of manufacturing airplanes modifications were made in engine make and horse power, airframe and accessories. A large number of survivors exist, with a large collections residing at the Historic Aircraft Restoration Museum at Dauster Field, Creve Coeur, near St Louis, and the Missouri and Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum in Hood River, Oregon.
The original Waco facility hangar in Troy, Ohio is now the headquarters of United Technologies Aerospace Systems - Landing Systems business unit. It manufactures wheels and brakes for aircraft. The Waco Air Museum (Wacoairmuseum.org) is located on Waco Field, a grass strip at the south edge of Troy, Ohio. The Museum has a collection of Wacos and the Aviation Learning Center.

Barry clearly has an intense interest in his Waco airplanes and has an extensive knowledge about Waco and models of Waco airplanes. He has a large library of drawings of Waco plans. Following his discussion and answering a number of questions the group walked over to Barry’s hangers to see both of his Waco’s.
As to his current project, Barry was looking for a challenge and found one in a 1932 model UBA. This airplane was one of the 22 side by side WACOs built. It was delivered with a removable top that was called the winter enclosure. His other Waco is a 1931 QCF-2. It is also beautiful and yearns to fly. Barry loaded us with numerous details and his experiences with both airplanes. He has a deep interest and knowledge about his and other Waco models and invites questions.
Chapter member Barry Branin (also a Flabob Chapter 1 member) began his presentation about his Waco’s and Waco airplanes by indicating that several companies operated under the Waco name, the first company being the Weaver Aircraft Company, a firm founded by George E. Weaver, Clayton Bruckner, and Elwood Junkin in 1920 in Lorain and Medina, Ohio after they had already been collaborating for several years building airplanes of their own design. In the spring of 1923 this became the Advance Aircraft Company in Troy, Ohio, after the departure of Weaver. At some point it was changed from Advance Aircraft Company to Waco (Wah-co) Aircraft Company.

By the 1930s the company, known as Waco Aircraft was a leader in the design of wood and fabric aircraft with Waco aircraft being operated by public, private, and corporate owners in many countries. During World War II Waco was devoted entirely to war production. The small facility in Troy, Ohio had an active part in the Civilian Pilot Training program. In 1940 the Waco PT-14 (UPF-7)was approved for Secondary Training. At the peak, the small facility was building three PT-14s a day as well as maintaining the scheduled Cabin Waco production.

Waco engineers helped design the Troop glider that was used in the war. During World War II large numbers of military gliders were produced for the RAF and US Army Air Forces airborne operations, especially during the Normandy Invasion and “Operation Market Garden”. The Waco CG-4 was the most numerous of their glider designs to be produced. Waco built 1,607 gliders. Another 13,402 gliders were built by other companies who subcontracted under the Waco Aircraft Company. As an example Ford Motor Company built many thousand Waco gliders at its plant in Ypsilanti, Michigan.
Following the war Waco attempted to market a entirely new design but the postwar slump in the private aviation market and the high development costs of the aircraft forced Waco to withdraw from aircraft manufacturing. in June 1947 Waco ceased operations having suffered the fate of a number of general aviation companies when an anticipated boom in aviation following World War II failed to develop.
Waco established themselves as producers of reliable, rugged planes that were popular with travelling businessmen sport pilots, postal services and explorers, especially when after 1930 the company began producing closed-cabin biplane models in addition to open cockpit biplanes. The Waco name was extremely well represented in the U.S. civil aircraft registry between the wars, with more Waco’s registered than the aircraft of any other company.

Production types included open cockpit biplanes, cabin biplanes and cabin sesquiplanes (known by Waco as Custom Cabins) as well as numerous experimental types. These custom cabin airplanes had a smaller bottom wing. They were faster than the Standard cabin models. The last Custom cabin model was the SRE. It used a 450 hp Pratt and Whitney engine with a smooth cowl and would do 200 mph. During its twenty-eight year existence Waco produced sixty-two different aircraft models and led all its competitors in number of aircraft registered. The Waco 10 was the most produced airplane model; 1,623 were produced. Total production of all model Wacos is estimated at 6500.

Many Waco Cabin Biplanes that were originally sold as civilian aircraft were impressed into military service in World War II. The United States Army Air Forces classified them regardless of type as Waco C-72s, with type letters identifying specific models. They were used as coastal patrols and one is credited with sinking a submarine off of the Texas coast. A 1933 Waco UIC was at Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941, and survived because it was out on a training flight that Sunday. Waco produced over 600 of its UPF-7 open biplanes and 21 VKS7F cabin biplanes for the Civilian Pilot Training Program, which supplemented the output for military training aircraft. These “F7s” are much desired in the Antique Aviation community today because of their wide landing gear and reliable Continental W670 engine.
Waco civilian designations used letters to describe the various models of the aircraft. The first letter is the engine used. Each engine make and size was given an arbitrary letter code. The second letter designated the wing planform, and the third letter the general series. Example would be the UPF-7. U= engine, Continental W670. P=Wings, Clark Y with a 40 gallon fuel tanks in the center section with the back of the center section cut out so the front seat passenger could exit the airplane if necessary during acrobatics. The F-7 code was the seventh iteration of the open cockpit tandem airplane. The first coding system was changed in 1929 with several letters reassigned, and later with the introduction of the Custom Cabin series, the third letter 'C' was initially replaced with C-S (Cabin-Standard) and finally S. The numeral suffix represents the first year of production if it is 6 or higher (6=1936), or a sub type if 2 or less. Thus EGC-7 is a Wright R-760-E2 (350 hp engine), cabin biplane airframe, custom cabin model first manufactured in 1937.

Barry mentioned that Waco used several different engines and variations of those engines when manufacturing their airplanes. Initially the war surplus Curtiss OX-5 and the Liberty engines were used. These were soon abandoned for lighter weight air cooled radial engines. These air-cooled engines demonstrated their value when Charles Lindbergh flew the Atlantic behind an air-cooled Wright. When the Depression hit the country, smaller engines were introduced by Kinner, Warner, Wright and Continental. The first Continental radial was an A-70 (Q) which did not have overhead oiling. This was followed by the Continental R-670 (U). Other engines utilized were manufactured by 350 hp Wright (E), 125 hp Kinner (I) and 170 hp Jacobs (P), 245 hp Jacobs (Y), and 450 hp Pratt and Whitney (S). Waco made tandem, and side by side seating as well as cabin models. A few Waco N series airplanes were nose wheel and were produced during 1937-38.

Throughout the years of manufacturing airplanes modifications were made in engine make and horse power, airframe and accessories. A large number of survivors exist, with a large collections residing at the Historic Aircraft Restoration Museum at Dauster Field, Creve Coeur, near St Louis, and the Missouri and Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum in Hood River, Oregon.
The original Waco facility hangar in Troy, Ohio is now the headquarters of United Technologies Aerospace Systems - Landing Systems business unit. It manufactures wheels and brakes for aircraft. The Waco Air Museum (Wacoairmuseum.org) is located on Waco Field, a grass strip at the south edge of Troy, Ohio. The Museum has a collection of Wacos and the Aviation Learning Center.

Barry clearly has an intense interest in his Waco airplanes and has an extensive knowledge about Waco and models of Waco airplanes. He has a large library of drawings of Waco plans. Following his discussion and answering a number of questions the group walked over to Barry’s hangers to see both of his Waco’s.
As to his current project, Barry was looking for a challenge and found one in a 1932 model UBA. This airplane was one of the 22 side by side WACOs built. It was delivered with a removable top that was called the winter enclosure. His other Waco is a 1931 QCF-2. It is also beautiful and yearns to fly. Barry loaded us with numerous details and his experiences with both airplanes. He has a deep interest and knowledge about his and other Waco models and invites questions.
Chapter member Barry Branin (also a Flabob Chapter 1 member) began his presentation about his Waco’s and Waco airplanes by indicating that several companies operated under the Waco name, the first company being the Weaver Aircraft Company, a firm founded by George E. Weaver, Clayton Bruckner, and Elwood Junkin in 1920 in Lorain and Medina, Ohio after they had already been collaborating for several years building airplanes of their own design. In the spring of 1923 this became the Advance Aircraft Company in Troy, Ohio, after the departure of Weaver. At some point it was changed from Advance Aircraft Company to Waco (Wah-co) Aircraft Company.

By the 1930s the company, known as Waco Aircraft was a leader in the design of wood and fabric aircraft with Waco aircraft being operated by public, private, and corporate owners in many countries. During World War II Waco was devoted entirely to war production. The small facility in Troy, Ohio had an active part in the Civilian Pilot Training program. In 1940 the Waco PT-14 (UPF-7)was approved for Secondary Training. At the peak, the small facility was building three PT-14s a day as well as maintaining the scheduled Cabin Waco production.

Waco engineers helped design the Troop glider that was used in the war. During World War II large numbers of military gliders were produced for the RAF and US Army Air Forces airborne operations, especially during the Normandy Invasion and “Operation Market Garden”. The Waco CG-4 was the most numerous of their glider designs to be produced. Waco built 1,607 gliders. Another 13,402 gliders were built by other companies who subcontracted under the Waco Aircraft Company. As an example Ford Motor Company built many thousand Waco gliders at its plant in Ypsilanti, Michigan.
Following the war Waco attempted to market a entirely new design but the postwar slump in the private aviation market and the high development costs of the aircraft forced Waco to withdraw from aircraft manufacturing. in June 1947 Waco ceased operations having suffered the fate of a number of general aviation companies when an anticipated boom in aviation following World War II failed to develop.
Waco established themselves as producers of reliable, rugged planes that were popular with travelling businessmen sport pilots, postal services and explorers, especially when after 1930 the company began producing closed-cabin biplane models in addition to open cockpit biplanes. The Waco name was extremely well represented in the U.S. civil aircraft registry between the wars, with more Waco’s registered than the aircraft of any other company.

Production types included open cockpit biplanes, cabin biplanes and cabin sesquiplanes (known by Waco as Custom Cabins) as well as numerous experimental types. These custom cabin airplanes had a smaller bottom wing. They were faster than the Standard cabin models. The last Custom cabin model was the SRE. It used a 450 hp Pratt and Whitney engine with a smooth cowl and would do 200 mph. During its twenty-eight year existence Waco produced sixty-two different aircraft models and led all its competitors in number of aircraft registered. The Waco 10 was the most produced airplane model; 1,623 were produced. Total production of all model Wacos is estimated at 6500.

Many Waco Cabin Biplanes that were originally sold as civilian aircraft were impressed into military service in World War II. The United States Army Air Forces classified them regardless of type as Waco C-72s, with type letters identifying specific models. They were used as coastal patrols and one is credited with sinking a submarine off of the Texas coast. A 1933 Waco UIC was at Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941, and survived because it was out on a training flight that Sunday. Waco produced over 600 of its UPF-7 open biplanes and 21 VKS7F cabin biplanes for the Civilian Pilot Training Program, which supplemented the output for military training aircraft. These “F7s” are much desired in the Antique Aviation community today because of their wide landing gear and reliable Continental W670 engine.
Waco civilian designations used letters to describe the various models of the aircraft. The first letter is the engine used. Each engine make and size was given an arbitrary letter code. The second letter designated the wing planform, and the third letter the general series. Example would be the UPF-7. U= engine, Continental W670. P=Wings, Clark Y with a 40 gallon fuel tanks in the center section with the back of the center section cut out so the front seat passenger could exit the airplane if necessary during acrobatics. The F-7 code was the seventh iteration of the open cockpit tandem airplane. The first coding system was changed in 1929 with several letters reassigned, and later with the introduction of the Custom Cabin series, the third letter 'C' was initially replaced with C-S (Cabin-Standard) and finally S. The numeral suffix represents the first year of production if it is 6 or higher (6=1936), or a sub type if 2 or less. Thus EGC-7 is a Wright R-760-E2 (350 hp engine), cabin biplane airframe, custom cabin model first manufactured in 1937.

Barry mentioned that Waco used several different engines and variations of those engines when manufacturing their airplanes. Initially the war surplus Curtiss OX-5 and the Liberty engines were used. These were soon abandoned for lighter weight air cooled radial engines. These air-cooled engines demonstrated their value when Charles Lindbergh flew the Atlantic behind an air-cooled Wright. When the Depression hit the country, smaller engines were introduced by Kinner, Warner, Wright and Continental. The first Continental radial was an A-70 (Q) which did not have overhead oiling. This was followed by the Continental R-670 (U). Other engines utilized were manufactured by 350 hp Wright (E), 125 hp Kinner (I) and 170 hp Jacobs (P), 245 hp Jacobs (Y), and 450 hp Pratt and Whitney (S). Waco made tandem, and side by side seating as well as cabin models. A few Waco N series airplanes were nose wheel and were produced during 1937-38.

Throughout the years of manufacturing airplanes modifications were made in engine make and horse power, airframe and accessories. A large number of survivors exist, with a large collections residing at the Historic Aircraft Restoration Museum at Dauster Field, Creve Coeur, near St Louis, and the Missouri and Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum in Hood River, Oregon.
The original Waco facility hangar in Troy, Ohio is now the headquarters of United Technologies Aerospace Systems - Landing Systems business unit. It manufactures wheels and brakes for aircraft. The Waco Air Museum (Wacoairmuseum.org) is located on Waco Field, a grass strip at the south edge of Troy, Ohio. The Museum has a collection of Wacos and the Aviation Learning Center.

Barry clearly has an intense interest in his Waco airplanes and has an extensive knowledge about Waco and models of Waco airplanes. He has a large library of drawings of Waco plans. Following his discussion and answering a number of questions the group walked over to Barry’s hangers to see both of his Waco’s.
As to his current project, Barry was looking for a challenge and found one in a 1932 model UBA. This airplane was one of the 22 side by side WACOs built. It was delivered with a removable top that was called the winter enclosure. His other Waco is a 1931 QCF-2. It is also beautiful and yearns to fly. Barry loaded us with numerous details and his experiences with both airplanes. He has a deep interest and knowledge about his and other Waco models and invites questions.
Chapter member Barry Branin (also a Flabob Chapter 1 member) began his presentation about his Waco’s and Waco airplanes by indicating that several companies operated under the Waco name, the first company being the Weaver Aircraft Company, a firm founded by George E. Weaver, Clayton Bruckner, and Elwood Junkin in 1920 in Lorain and Medina, Ohio after they had already been collaborating for several years building airplanes of their own design. In the spring of 1923 this became the Advance Aircraft Company in Troy, Ohio, after the departure of Weaver. At some point it was changed from Advance Aircraft Company to Waco (Wah-co) Aircraft Company.

By the 1930s the company, known as Waco Aircraft was a leader in the design of wood and fabric aircraft with Waco aircraft being operated by public, private, and corporate owners in many countries. During World War II Waco was devoted entirely to war production. The small facility in Troy, Ohio had an active part in the Civilian Pilot Training program. In 1940 the Waco PT-14 (UPF-7)was approved for Secondary Training. At the peak, the small facility was building three PT-14s a day as well as maintaining the scheduled Cabin Waco production.

Waco engineers helped design the Troop glider that was used in the war. During World War II large numbers of military gliders were produced for the RAF and US Army Air Forces airborne operations, especially during the Normandy Invasion and “Operation Market Garden”. The Waco CG-4 was the most numerous of their glider designs to be produced. Waco built 1,607 gliders. Another 13,402 gliders were built by other companies who subcontracted under the Waco Aircraft Company. As an example Ford Motor Company built many thousand Waco gliders at its plant in Ypsilanti, Michigan.
Following the war Waco attempted to market a entirely new design but the postwar slump in the private aviation market and the high development costs of the aircraft forced Waco to withdraw from aircraft manufacturing. in June 1947 Waco ceased operations having suffered the fate of a number of general aviation companies when an anticipated boom in aviation following World War II failed to develop.
Waco established themselves as producers of reliable, rugged planes that were popular with travelling businessmen sport pilots, postal services and explorers, especially when after 1930 the company began producing closed-cabin biplane models in addition to open cockpit biplanes. The Waco name was extremely well represented in the U.S. civil aircraft registry between the wars, with more Waco’s registered than the aircraft of any other company.

Production types included open cockpit biplanes, cabin biplanes and cabin sesquiplanes (known by Waco as Custom Cabins) as well as numerous experimental types. These custom cabin airplanes had a smaller bottom wing. They were faster than the Standard cabin models. The last Custom cabin model was the SRE. It used a 450 hp Pratt and Whitney engine with a smooth cowl and would do 200 mph. During its twenty-eight year existence Waco produced sixty-two different aircraft models and led all its competitors in number of aircraft registered. The Waco 10 was the most produced airplane model; 1,623 were produced. Total production of all model Wacos is estimated at 6500.

Many Waco Cabin Biplanes that were originally sold as civilian aircraft were impressed into military service in World War II. The United States Army Air Forces classified them regardless of type as Waco C-72s, with type letters identifying specific models. They were used as coastal patrols and one is credited with sinking a submarine off of the Texas coast. A 1933 Waco UIC was at Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941, and survived because it was out on a training flight that Sunday. Waco produced over 600 of its UPF-7 open biplanes and 21 VKS7F cabin biplanes for the Civilian Pilot Training Program, which supplemented the output for military training aircraft. These “F7s” are much desired in the Antique Aviation community today because of their wide landing gear and reliable Continental W670 engine.
Waco civilian designations used letters to describe the various models of the aircraft. The first letter is the engine used. Each engine make and size was given an arbitrary letter code. The second letter designated the wing planform, and the third letter the general series. Example would be the UPF-7. U= engine, Continental W670. P=Wings, Clark Y with a 40 gallon fuel tanks in the center section with the back of the center section cut out so the front seat passenger could exit the airplane if necessary during acrobatics. The F-7 code was the seventh iteration of the open cockpit tandem airplane. The first coding system was changed in 1929 with several letters reassigned, and later with the introduction of the Custom Cabin series, the third letter 'C' was initially replaced with C-S (Cabin-Standard) and finally S. The numeral suffix represents the first year of production if it is 6 or higher (6=1936), or a sub type if 2 or less. Thus EGC-7 is a Wright R-760-E2 (350 hp engine), cabin biplane airframe, custom cabin model first manufactured in 1937.

Barry mentioned that Waco used several different engines and variations of those engines when manufacturing their airplanes. Initially the war surplus Curtiss OX-5 and the Liberty engines were used. These were soon abandoned for lighter weight air cooled radial engines. These air-cooled engines demonstrated their value when Charles Lindbergh flew the Atlantic behind an air-cooled Wright. When the Depression hit the country, smaller engines were introduced by Kinner, Warner, Wright and Continental. The first Continental radial was an A-70 (Q) which did not have overhead oiling. This was followed by the Continental R-670 (U). Other engines utilized were manufactured by 350 hp Wright (E), 125 hp Kinner (I) and 170 hp Jacobs (P), 245 hp Jacobs (Y), and 450 hp Pratt and Whitney (S). Waco made tandem, and side by side seating as well as cabin models. A few Waco N series airplanes were nose wheel and were produced during 1937-38.

Throughout the years of manufacturing airplanes modifications were made in engine make and horse power, airframe and accessories. A large number of survivors exist, with a large collections residing at the Historic Aircraft Restoration Museum at Dauster Field, Creve Coeur, near St Louis, and the Missouri and Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum in Hood River, Oregon.
The original Waco facility hangar in Troy, Ohio is now the headquarters of United Technologies Aerospace Systems - Landing Systems business unit. It manufactures wheels and brakes for aircraft. The Waco Air Museum (Wacoairmuseum.org) is located on Waco Field, a grass strip at the south edge of Troy, Ohio. The Museum has a collection of Wacos and the Aviation Learning Center.

Barry clearly has an intense interest in his Waco airplanes and has an extensive knowledge about Waco and models of Waco airplanes. He has a large library of drawings of Waco plans. Following his discussion and answering a number of questions the group walked over to Barry’s hangers to see both of his Waco’s.
As to his current project, Barry was looking for a challenge and found one in a 1932 model UBA. This airplane was one of the 22 side by side WACOs built. It was delivered with a removable top that was called the winter enclosure. His other Waco is a 1931 QCF-2. It is also beautiful and yearns to fly. Barry loaded us with numerous details and his experiences with both airplanes. He has a deep interest and knowledge about his and other Waco models and invites questions.
Chapter member Barry Branin (also a Flabob Chapter 1 member) began his presentation about his Waco’s and Waco airplanes by indicating that several companies operated under the Waco name, the first company being the Weaver Aircraft Company, a firm founded by George E. Weaver, Clayton Bruckner, and Elwood Junkin in 1920 in Lorain and Medina, Ohio after they had already been collaborating for several years building airplanes of their own design. In the spring of 1923 this became the Advance Aircraft Company in Troy, Ohio, after the departure of Weaver. At some point it was changed from Advance Aircraft Company to Waco (Wah-co) Aircraft Company.

By the 1930s the company, known as Waco Aircraft was a leader in the design of wood and fabric aircraft with Waco aircraft being operated by public, private, and corporate owners in many countries. During World War II Waco was devoted entirely to war production. The small facility in Troy, Ohio had an active part in the Civilian Pilot Training program. In 1940 the Waco PT-14 (UPF-7)was approved for Secondary Training. At the peak, the small facility was building three PT-14s a day as well as maintaining the scheduled Cabin Waco production.

Waco engineers helped design the Troop glider that was used in the war. During World War II large numbers of military gliders were produced for the RAF and US Army Air Forces airborne operations, especially during the Normandy Invasion and “Operation Market Garden”. The Waco CG-4 was the most numerous of their glider designs to be produced. Waco built 1,607 gliders. Another 13,402 gliders were built by other companies who subcontracted under the Waco Aircraft Company. As an example Ford Motor Company built many thousand Waco gliders at its plant in Ypsilanti, Michigan.
Following the war Waco attempted to market a entirely new design but the postwar slump in the private aviation market and the high development costs of the aircraft forced Waco to withdraw from aircraft manufacturing. in June 1947 Waco ceased operations having suffered the fate of a number of general aviation companies when an anticipated boom in aviation following World War II failed to develop.
Waco established themselves as producers of reliable, rugged planes that were popular with travelling businessmen sport pilots, postal services and explorers, especially when after 1930 the company began producing closed-cabin biplane models in addition to open cockpit biplanes. The Waco name was extremely well represented in the U.S. civil aircraft registry between the wars, with more Waco’s registered than the aircraft of any other company.

Production types included open cockpit biplanes, cabin biplanes and cabin sesquiplanes (known by Waco as Custom Cabins) as well as numerous experimental types. These custom cabin airplanes had a smaller bottom wing. They were faster than the Standard cabin models. The last Custom cabin model was the SRE. It used a 450 hp Pratt and Whitney engine with a smooth cowl and would do 200 mph. During its twenty-eight year existence Waco produced sixty-two different aircraft models and led all its competitors in number of aircraft registered. The Waco 10 was the most produced airplane model; 1,623 were produced. Total production of all model Wacos is estimated at 6500.

Many Waco Cabin Biplanes that were originally sold as civilian aircraft were impressed into military service in World War II. The United States Army Air Forces classified them regardless of type as Waco C-72s, with type letters identifying specific models. They were used as coastal patrols and one is credited with sinking a submarine off of the Texas coast. A 1933 Waco UIC was at Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941, and survived because it was out on a training flight that Sunday. Waco produced over 600 of its UPF-7 open biplanes and 21 VKS7F cabin biplanes for the Civilian Pilot Training Program, which supplemented the output for military training aircraft. These “F7s” are much desired in the Antique Aviation community today because of their wide landing gear and reliable Continental W670 engine.
Waco civilian designations used letters to describe the various models of the aircraft. The first letter is the engine used. Each engine make and size was given an arbitrary letter code. The second letter designated the wing planform, and the third letter the general series. Example would be the UPF-7. U= engine, Continental W670. P=Wings, Clark Y with a 40 gallon fuel tanks in the center section with the back of the center section cut out so the front seat passenger could exit the airplane if necessary during acrobatics. The F-7 code was the seventh iteration of the open cockpit tandem airplane. The first coding system was changed in 1929 with several letters reassigned, and later with the introduction of the Custom Cabin series, the third letter 'C' was initially replaced with C-S (Cabin-Standard) and finally S. The numeral suffix represents the first year of production if it is 6 or higher (6=1936), or a sub type if 2 or less. Thus EGC-7 is a Wright R-760-E2 (350 hp engine), cabin biplane airframe, custom cabin model first manufactured in 1937.

Barry mentioned that Waco used several different engines and variations of those engines when manufacturing their airplanes. Initially the war surplus Curtiss OX-5 and the Liberty engines were used. These were soon abandoned for lighter weight air cooled radial engines. These air-cooled engines demonstrated their value when Charles Lindbergh flew the Atlantic behind an air-cooled Wright. When the Depression hit the country, smaller engines were introduced by Kinner, Warner, Wright and Continental. The first Continental radial was an A-70 (Q) which did not have overhead oiling. This was followed by the Continental R-670 (U). Other engines utilized were manufactured by 350 hp Wright (E), 125 hp Kinner (I) and 170 hp Jacobs (P), 245 hp Jacobs (Y), and 450 hp Pratt and Whitney (S). Waco made tandem, and side by side seating as well as cabin models. A few Waco N series airplanes were nose wheel and were produced during 1937-38.

Throughout the years of manufacturing airplanes modifications were made in engine make and horse power, airframe and accessories. A large number of survivors exist, with a large collections residing at the Historic Aircraft Restoration Museum at Dauster Field, Creve Coeur, near St Louis, and the Missouri and Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum in Hood River, Oregon.
The original Waco facility hangar in Troy, Ohio is now the headquarters of United Technologies Aerospace Systems - Landing Systems business unit. It manufactures wheels and brakes for aircraft. The Waco Air Museum (Wacoairmuseum.org) is located on Waco Field, a grass strip at the south edge of Troy, Ohio. The Museum has a collection of Wacos and the Aviation Learning Center.

Barry clearly has an intense interest in his Waco airplanes and has an extensive knowledge about Waco and models of Waco airplanes. He has a large library of drawings of Waco plans. Following his discussion and answering a number of questions the group walked over to Barry’s hangers to see both of his Waco’s.
As to his current project, Barry was looking for a challenge and found one in a 1932 model UBA. This airplane was one of the 22 side by side WACOs built. It was delivered with a removable top that was called the winter enclosure. His other Waco is a 1931 QCF-2. It is also beautiful and yearns to fly. Barry loaded us with numerous details and his experiences with both airplanes. He has a deep interest and knowledge about his and other Waco models and invites questions.
Chapter member Barry Branin (also a Flabob Chapter 1 member) began his presentation about his Waco’s and Waco airplanes by indicating that several companies operated under the Waco name, the first company being the Weaver Aircraft Company, a firm founded by George E. Weaver, Clayton Bruckner, and Elwood Junkin in 1920 in Lorain and Medina, Ohio after they had already been collaborating for several years building airplanes of their own design. In the spring of 1923 this became the Advance Aircraft Company in Troy, Ohio, after the departure of Weaver. At some point it was changed from Advance Aircraft Company to Waco (Wah-co) Aircraft Company.

By the 1930s the company, known as Waco Aircraft was a leader in the design of wood and fabric aircraft with Waco aircraft being operated by public, private, and corporate owners in many countries. During World War II Waco was devoted entirely to war production. The small facility in Troy, Ohio had an active part in the Civilian Pilot Training program. In 1940 the Waco PT-14 (UPF-7)was approved for Secondary Training. At the peak, the small facility was building three PT-14s a day as well as maintaining the scheduled Cabin Waco production.

Waco engineers helped design the Troop glider that was used in the war. During World War II large numbers of military gliders were produced for the RAF and US Army Air Forces airborne operations, especially during the Normandy Invasion and “Operation Market Garden”. The Waco CG-4 was the most numerous of their glider designs to be produced. Waco built 1,607 gliders. Another 13,402 gliders were built by other companies who subcontracted under the Waco Aircraft Company. As an example Ford Motor Company built many thousand Waco gliders at its plant in Ypsilanti, Michigan.
Following the war Waco attempted to market a entirely new design but the postwar slump in the private aviation market and the high development costs of the aircraft forced Waco to withdraw from aircraft manufacturing. in June 1947 Waco ceased operations having suffered the fate of a number of general aviation companies when an anticipated boom in aviation following World War II failed to develop.
Waco established themselves as producers of reliable, rugged planes that were popular with travelling businessmen sport pilots, postal services and explorers, especially when after 1930 the company began producing closed-cabin biplane models in addition to open cockpit biplanes. The Waco name was extremely well represented in the U.S. civil aircraft registry between the wars, with more Waco’s registered than the aircraft of any other company.

Production types included open cockpit biplanes, cabin biplanes and cabin sesquiplanes (known by Waco as Custom Cabins) as well as numerous experimental types. These custom cabin airplanes had a smaller bottom wing. They were faster than the Standard cabin models. The last Custom cabin model was the SRE. It used a 450 hp Pratt and Whitney engine with a smooth cowl and would do 200 mph. During its twenty-eight year existence Waco produced sixty-two different aircraft models and led all its competitors in number of aircraft registered. The Waco 10 was the most produced airplane model; 1,623 were produced. Total production of all model Wacos is estimated at 6500.

Many Waco Cabin Biplanes that were originally sold as civilian aircraft were impressed into military service in World War II. The United States Army Air Forces classified them regardless of type as Waco C-72s, with type letters identifying specific models. They were used as coastal patrols and one is credited with sinking a submarine off of the Texas coast. A 1933 Waco UIC was at Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941, and survived because it was out on a training flight that Sunday. Waco produced over 600 of its UPF-7 open biplanes and 21 VKS7F cabin biplanes for the Civilian Pilot Training Program, which supplemented the output for military training aircraft. These “F7s” are much desired in the Antique Aviation community today because of their wide landing gear and reliable Continental W670 engine.
Waco civilian designations used letters to describe the various models of the aircraft. The first letter is the engine used. Each engine make and size was given an arbitrary letter code. The second letter designated the wing planform, and the third letter the general series. Example would be the UPF-7. U= engine, Continental W670. P=Wings, Clark Y with a 40 gallon fuel tanks in the center section with the back of the center section cut out so the front seat passenger could exit the airplane if necessary during acrobatics. The F-7 code was the seventh iteration of the open cockpit tandem airplane. The first coding system was changed in 1929 with several letters reassigned, and later with the introduction of the Custom Cabin series, the third letter 'C' was initially replaced with C-S (Cabin-Standard) and finally S. The numeral suffix represents the first year of production if it is 6 or higher (6=1936), or a sub type if 2 or less. Thus EGC-7 is a Wright R-760-E2 (350 hp engine), cabin biplane airframe, custom cabin model first manufactured in 1937.

Barry mentioned that Waco used several different engines and variations of those engines when manufacturing their airplanes. Initially the war surplus Curtiss OX-5 and the Liberty engines were used. These were soon abandoned for lighter weight air cooled radial engines. These air-cooled engines demonstrated their value when Charles Lindbergh flew the Atlantic behind an air-cooled Wright. When the Depression hit the country, smaller engines were introduced by Kinner, Warner, Wright and Continental. The first Continental radial was an A-70 (Q) which did not have overhead oiling. This was followed by the Continental R-670 (U). Other engines utilized were manufactured by 350 hp Wright (E), 125 hp Kinner (I) and 170 hp Jacobs (P), 245 hp Jacobs (Y), and 450 hp Pratt and Whitney (S). Waco made tandem, and side by side seating as well as cabin models. A few Waco N series airplanes were nose wheel and were produced during 1937-38.

Throughout the years of manufacturing airplanes modifications were made in engine make and horse power, airframe and accessories. A large number of survivors exist, with a large collections residing at the Historic Aircraft Restoration Museum at Dauster Field, Creve Coeur, near St Louis, and the Missouri and Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum in Hood River, Oregon.
The original Waco facility hangar in Troy, Ohio is now the headquarters of United Technologies Aerospace Systems - Landing Systems business unit. It manufactures wheels and brakes for aircraft. The Waco Air Museum (Wacoairmuseum.org) is located on Waco Field, a grass strip at the south edge of Troy, Ohio. The Museum has a collection of Wacos and the Aviation Learning Center.

Barry clearly has an intense interest in his Waco airplanes and has an extensive knowledge about Waco and models of Waco airplanes. He has a large library of drawings of Waco plans. Following his discussion and answering a number of questions the group walked over to Barry’s hangers to see both of his Waco’s.
As to his current project, Barry was looking for a challenge and found one in a 1932 model UBA. This airplane was one of the 22 side by side WACOs built. It was delivered with a removable top that was called the winter enclosure. His other Waco is a 1931 QCF-2. It is also beautiful and yearns to fly. Barry loaded us with numerous details and his experiences with both airplanes. He has a deep interest and knowledge about his and other Waco models and invites questions.
Chapter member Barry Branin (also a Flabob Chapter 1 member) began his presentation about his Waco’s and Waco airplanes by indicating that several companies operated under the Waco name, the first company being the Weaver Aircraft Company, a firm founded by George E. Weaver, Clayton Bruckner, and Elwood Junkin in 1920 in Lorain and Medina, Ohio after they had already been collaborating for several years building airplanes of their own design. In the spring of 1923 this became the Advance Aircraft Company in Troy, Ohio, after the departure of Weaver. At some point it was changed from Advance Aircraft Company to Waco (Wah-co) Aircraft Company.

By the 1930s the company, known as Waco Aircraft was a leader in the design of wood and fabric aircraft with Waco aircraft being operated by public, private, and corporate owners in many countries. During World War II Waco was devoted entirely to war production. The small facility in Troy, Ohio had an active part in the Civilian Pilot Training program. In 1940 the Waco PT-14 (UPF-7)was approved for Secondary Training. At the peak, the small facility was building three PT-14s a day as well as maintaining the scheduled Cabin Waco production.

Waco engineers helped design the Troop glider that was used in the war. During World War II large numbers of military gliders were produced for the RAF and US Army Air Forces airborne operations, especially during the Normandy Invasion and “Operation Market Garden”. The Waco CG-4 was the most numerous of their glider designs to be produced. Waco built 1,607 gliders. Another 13,402 gliders were built by other companies who subcontracted under the Waco Aircraft Company. As an example Ford Motor Company built many thousand Waco gliders at its plant in Ypsilanti, Michigan.
Following the war Waco attempted to market a entirely new design but the postwar slump in the private aviation market and the high development costs of the aircraft forced Waco to withdraw from aircraft manufacturing. in June 1947 Waco ceased operations having suffered the fate of a number of general aviation companies when an anticipated boom in aviation following World War II failed to develop.
Waco established themselves as producers of reliable, rugged planes that were popular with travelling businessmen sport pilots, postal services and explorers, especially when after 1930 the company began producing closed-cabin biplane models in addition to open cockpit biplanes. The Waco name was extremely well represented in the U.S. civil aircraft registry between the wars, with more Waco’s registered than the aircraft of any other company.

Production types included open cockpit biplanes, cabin biplanes and cabin sesquiplanes (known by Waco as Custom Cabins) as well as numerous experimental types. These custom cabin airplanes had a smaller bottom wing. They were faster than the Standard cabin models. The last Custom cabin model was the SRE. It used a 450 hp Pratt and Whitney engine with a smooth cowl and would do 200 mph. During its twenty-eight year existence Waco produced sixty-two different aircraft models and led all its competitors in number of aircraft registered. The Waco 10 was the most produced airplane model; 1,623 were produced. Total production of all model Wacos is estimated at 6500.

Many Waco Cabin Biplanes that were originally sold as civilian aircraft were impressed into military service in World War II. The United States Army Air Forces classified them regardless of type as Waco C-72s, with type letters identifying specific models. They were used as coastal patrols and one is credited with sinking a submarine off of the Texas coast. A 1933 Waco UIC was at Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941, and survived because it was out on a training flight that Sunday. Waco produced over 600 of its UPF-7 open biplanes and 21 VKS7F cabin biplanes for the Civilian Pilot Training Program, which supplemented the output for military training aircraft. These “F7s” are much desired in the Antique Aviation community today because of their wide landing gear and reliable Continental W670 engine.
Waco civilian designations used letters to describe the various models of the aircraft. The first letter is the engine used. Each engine make and size was given an arbitrary letter code. The second letter designated the wing planform, and the third letter the general series. Example would be the UPF-7. U= engine, Continental W670. P=Wings, Clark Y with a 40 gallon fuel tanks in the center section with the back of the center section cut out so the front seat passenger could exit the airplane if necessary during acrobatics. The F-7 code was the seventh iteration of the open cockpit tandem airplane. The first coding system was changed in 1929 with several letters reassigned, and later with the introduction of the Custom Cabin series, the third letter 'C' was initially replaced with C-S (Cabin-Standard) and finally S. The numeral suffix represents the first year of production if it is 6 or higher (6=1936), or a sub type if 2 or less. Thus EGC-7 is a Wright R-760-E2 (350 hp engine), cabin biplane airframe, custom cabin model first manufactured in 1937.

Barry mentioned that Waco used several different engines and variations of those engines when manufacturing their airplanes. Initially the war surplus Curtiss OX-5 and the Liberty engines were used. These were soon abandoned for lighter weight air cooled radial engines. These air-cooled engines demonstrated their value when Charles Lindbergh flew the Atlantic behind an air-cooled Wright. When the Depression hit the country, smaller engines were introduced by Kinner, Warner, Wright and Continental. The first Continental radial was an A-70 (Q) which did not have overhead oiling. This was followed by the Continental R-670 (U). Other engines utilized were manufactured by 350 hp Wright (E), 125 hp Kinner (I) and 170 hp Jacobs (P), 245 hp Jacobs (Y), and 450 hp Pratt and Whitney (S). Waco made tandem, and side by side seating as well as cabin models. A few Waco N series airplanes were nose wheel and were produced during 1937-38.

Throughout the years of manufacturing airplanes modifications were made in engine make and horse power, airframe and accessories. A large number of survivors exist, with a large collections residing at the Historic Aircraft Restoration Museum at Dauster Field, Creve Coeur, near St Louis, and the Missouri and Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum in Hood River, Oregon.
The original Waco facility hangar in Troy, Ohio is now the headquarters of United Technologies Aerospace Systems - Landing Systems business unit. It manufactures wheels and brakes for aircraft. The Waco Air Museum (Wacoairmuseum.org) is located on Waco Field, a grass strip at the south edge of Troy, Ohio. The Museum has a collection of Wacos and the Aviation Learning Center.

Barry clearly has an intense interest in his Waco airplanes and has an extensive knowledge about Waco and models of Waco airplanes. He has a large library of drawings of Waco plans. Following his discussion and answering a number of questions the group walked over to Barry’s hangers to see both of his Waco’s.
As to his current project, Barry was looking for a challenge and found one in a 1932 model UBA. This airplane was one of the 22 side by side WACOs built. It was delivered with a removable top that was called the winter enclosure. His other Waco is a 1931 QCF-2. It is also beautiful and yearns to fly. Barry loaded us with numerous details and his experiences with both airplanes. He has a deep interest and knowledge about his and other Waco models and invites questions.
Chapter member Barry Branin (also a Flabob Chapter 1 member) began his presentation about his Waco’s and Waco airplanes by indicating that several companies operated under the Waco name, the first company being the Weaver Aircraft Company, a firm founded by George E. Weaver, Clayton Bruckner, and Elwood Junkin in 1920 in Lorain and Medina, Ohio after they had already been collaborating for several years building airplanes of their own design. In the spring of 1923 this became the Advance Aircraft Company in Troy, Ohio, after the departure of Weaver. At some point it was changed from Advance Aircraft Company to Waco (Wah-co) Aircraft Company.
 
By the 1930s the company, known as Waco Aircraft was a leader in the design of wood and fabric aircraft with Waco aircraft being operated by public, private, and corporate owners in many countries. During World War II Waco was devoted entirely to war production. The small facility in Troy, Ohio had an active part in the Civilian Pilot Training program. In 1940 the Waco PT-14 (UPF-7)was approved for Secondary Training. At the peak, the small facility was building three PT-14s a day as well as maintaining the scheduled Cabin Waco production.
 
Waco engineers helped design the Troop glider that was used in the war. During World War II large numbers of military gliders were produced for the RAF and US Army Air Forces airborne operations, especially during the Normandy Invasion and “Operation Market Garden”. The Waco CG-4 was the most numerous of their glider designs to be produced. Waco built 1,607 gliders. Another 13,402 gliders were built by other companies who subcontracted under the Waco Aircraft Company. As an example Ford Motor Company built many thousand Waco gliders at its plant in Ypsilanti, Michigan.
Following the war Waco attempted to market a entirely new design but the postwar slump in the private aviation market and the high development costs of the aircraft forced Waco to withdraw from aircraft manufacturing. in June 1947 Waco ceased operations having suffered the fate of a number of general aviation companies when an anticipated boom in aviation following World War II failed to develop.
Waco established themselves as producers of reliable, rugged planes that were popular with travelling businessmen sport pilots, postal services and explorers, especially when after 1930 the company began producing closed-cabin biplane models in addition to open cockpit biplanes. The Waco name was extremely well represented in the U.S. civil aircraft registry between the wars, with more Waco’s registered than the aircraft of any other company.
 
Production types included open cockpit biplanes, cabin biplanes and cabin sesquiplanes (known by Waco as Custom Cabins) as well as numerous experimental types. These custom cabin airplanes had a smaller bottom wing. They were faster than the Standard cabin models. The last Custom cabin model was the SRE. It used a 450 hp Pratt and Whitney engine with a smooth cowl and would do 200 mph. During its twenty-eight year existence Waco produced sixty-two different aircraft models and led all its competitors in number of aircraft registered. The Waco 10 was the most produced airplane model; 1,623 were produced. Total production of all model Wacos is estimated at 6500. 
 
Many Waco Cabin Biplanes that were originally sold as civilian aircraft were impressed into military service in World War II. The United States Army Air Forces classified them regardless of type as Waco C-72s, with type letters identifying specific models. They were used as coastal patrols and one is credited with sinking a submarine off of the Texas coast. A 1933 Waco UIC was at Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941, and survived because it was out on a training flight that Sunday. Waco produced over 600 of its UPF-7 open biplanes and 21 VKS7F cabin biplanes for the Civilian Pilot Training Program, which supplemented the output for military training aircraft. These “F7s” are much desired in the Antique Aviation community today because of their wide landing gear and reliable Continental W670 engine.
Waco civilian designations used letters to describe the various models of the aircraft. The first letter is the engine used. Each engine make and size was given an arbitrary letter code. The second letter designated the wing planform, and the third letter the general series. Example would be the UPF-7. U= engine, Continental W670. P=Wings, Clark Y with a 40 gallon fuel tanks in the center section with the back of the center section cut out so the front seat passenger could exit the airplane if necessary during acrobatics. The F-7 code was the seventh iteration of the open cockpit tandem airplane. The first coding system was changed in 1929 with several letters reassigned, and later with the introduction of the Custom Cabin series, the third letter 'C' was initially replaced with C-S (Cabin-Standard) and finally S. The numeral suffix represents the first year of production if it is 6 or higher (6=1936), or a sub type if 2 or less. Thus EGC-7 is a Wright R-760-E2 (350 hp engine), cabin biplane airframe, custom cabin model first manufactured in 1937.
 
Barry mentioned that Waco used several different engines and variations of those engines when manufacturing their airplanes. Initially the war surplus Curtiss OX-5 and the Liberty engines were used. These were soon abandoned for lighter weight air cooled radial engines. These air-cooled engines demonstrated their value when Charles Lindbergh flew the Atlantic behind an air-cooled Wright. When the Depression hit the country, smaller engines were introduced by Kinner, Warner, Wright and Continental. The first Continental radial was an A-70 (Q) which did not have overhead oiling. This was followed by the Continental R-670 (U). Other engines utilized were manufactured by 350 hp Wright (E), 125 hp Kinner (I) and 170 hp Jacobs (P), 245 hp Jacobs (Y), and 450 hp Pratt and Whitney (S). Waco made tandem, and side by side seating as well as cabin models. A few Waco N series airplanes were nose wheel and were produced during 1937-38.
 
 Throughout the years of manufacturing airplanes modifications were made in engine make and horse power, airframe and accessories. A large number of survivors exist, with a large collections residing at the Historic Aircraft Restoration Museum at Dauster Field, Creve Coeur, near St Louis, and the Missouri and Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum in Hood River, Oregon.
 
Barry clearly has an intense interest in his Waco airplanes and has an extensive knowledge about Waco and models of Waco airplanes. He has a large library of drawings of Waco plans. Following his discussion and answering a number of questions the group walked over to Barry’s hangers to see both of his Waco’s.
As to his current project, Barry was looking for a challenge and found one in a 1932 model UBA. This airplane was one of the 22 side by side WACOs built. It was delivered with a removable top that was called the winter enclosure. His other Waco is a 1931 QCF-2. It is also beautiful and yearns to fly. Barry loaded us with numerous details and his experiences with both airplanes. He has a deep interest and knowledge about his and other Waco models and invites questions. 
The original Waco facility hangar in Troy, Ohio is now the headquarters of United Technologies Aerospace Systems - Landing Systems business unit. It manufactures wheels and brakes for aircraft. The Waco Air Museum (Wacoairmuseum.org) is located on Waco Field, a grass strip at the south edge of Troy, Ohio. The Museum has a collection of Wacos and the Aviation Learning Center.
Chapter member Barry Branin (also a Flabob Chapter 1 member) began his presentation about his Waco’s and Waco airplanes by indicating that several companies operated under the Waco name, the first company being the Weaver Aircraft Company, a firm founded by George E. Weaver, Clayton Bruckner, and Elwood Junkin in 1920 in Lorain and Medina, Ohio after they had already been collaborating for several years building airplanes of their own design. In the spring of 1923 this became the Advance Aircraft Company in Troy, Ohio, after the departure of Weaver. At some point it was changed from Advance Aircraft Company to Waco (Wah-co) Aircraft Company.

By the 1930s the company, known as Waco Aircraft was a leader in the design of wood and fabric aircraft with Waco aircraft being operated by public, private, and corporate owners in many countries. During World War II Waco was devoted entirely to war production. The small facility in Troy, Ohio had an active part in the Civilian Pilot Training program. In 1940 the Waco PT-14 (UPF-7)was approved for Secondary Training. At the peak, the small facility was building three PT-14s a day as well as maintaining the scheduled Cabin Waco production.

Waco engineers helped design the Troop glider that was used in the war. During World War II large numbers of military gliders were produced for the RAF and US Army Air Forces airborne operations, especially during the Normandy Invasion and “Operation Market Garden”. The Waco CG-4 was the most numerous of their glider designs to be produced. Waco built 1,607 gliders. Another 13,402 gliders were built by other companies who subcontracted under the Waco Aircraft Company. As an example Ford Motor Company built many thousand Waco gliders at its plant in Ypsilanti, Michigan.
Following the war Waco attempted to market a entirely new design but the postwar slump in the private aviation market and the high development costs of the aircraft forced Waco to withdraw from aircraft manufacturing. in June 1947 Waco ceased operations having suffered the fate of a number of general aviation companies when an anticipated boom in aviation following World War II failed to develop.
Waco established themselves as producers of reliable, rugged planes that were popular with travelling businessmen sport pilots, postal services and explorers, especially when after 1930 the company began producing closed-cabin biplane models in addition to open cockpit biplanes. The Waco name was extremely well represented in the U.S. civil aircraft registry between the wars, with more Waco’s registered than the aircraft of any other company.

Production types included open cockpit biplanes, cabin biplanes and cabin sesquiplanes (known by Waco as Custom Cabins) as well as numerous experimental types. These custom cabin airplanes had a smaller bottom wing. They were faster than the Standard cabin models. The last Custom cabin model was the SRE. It used a 450 hp Pratt and Whitney engine with a smooth cowl and would do 200 mph. During its twenty-eight year existence Waco produced sixty-two different aircraft models and led all its competitors in number of aircraft registered. The Waco 10 was the most produced airplane model; 1,623 were produced. Total production of all model Wacos is estimated at 6500.

Many Waco Cabin Biplanes that were originally sold as civilian aircraft were impressed into military service in World War II. The United States Army Air Forces classified them regardless of type as Waco C-72s, with type letters identifying specific models. They were used as coastal patrols and one is credited with sinking a submarine off of the Texas coast. A 1933 Waco UIC was at Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941, and survived because it was out on a training flight that Sunday. Waco produced over 600 of its UPF-7 open biplanes and 21 VKS7F cabin biplanes for the Civilian Pilot Training Program, which supplemented the output for military training aircraft. These “F7s” are much desired in the Antique Aviation community today because of their wide landing gear and reliable Continental W670 engine.
Waco civilian designations used letters to describe the various models of the aircraft. The first letter is the engine used. Each engine make and size was given an arbitrary letter code. The second letter designated the wing planform, and the third letter the general series. Example would be the UPF-7. U= engine, Continental W670. P=Wings, Clark Y with a 40 gallon fuel tanks in the center section with the back of the center section cut out so the front seat passenger could exit the airplane if necessary during acrobatics. The F-7 code was the seventh iteration of the open cockpit tandem airplane. The first coding system was changed in 1929 with several letters reassigned, and later with the introduction of the Custom Cabin series, the third letter 'C' was initially replaced with C-S (Cabin-Standard) and finally S. The numeral suffix represents the first year of production if it is 6 or higher (6=1936), or a sub type if 2 or less. Thus EGC-7 is a Wright R-760-E2 (350 hp engine), cabin biplane airframe, custom cabin model first manufactured in 1937.

Barry mentioned that Waco used several different engines and variations of those engines when manufacturing their airplanes. Initially the war surplus Curtiss OX-5 and the Liberty engines were used. These were soon abandoned for lighter weight air cooled radial engines. These air-cooled engines demonstrated their value when Charles Lindbergh flew the Atlantic behind an air-cooled Wright. When the Depression hit the country, smaller engines were introduced by Kinner, Warner, Wright and Continental. The first Continental radial was an A-70 (Q) which did not have overhead oiling. This was followed by the Continental R-670 (U). Other engines utilized were manufactured by 350 hp Wright (E), 125 hp Kinner (I) and 170 hp Jacobs (P), 245 hp Jacobs (Y), and 450 hp Pratt and Whitney (S). Waco made tandem, and side by side seating as well as cabin models. A few Waco N series airplanes were nose wheel and were produced during 1937-38.

Throughout the years of manufacturing airplanes modifications were made in engine make and horse power, airframe and accessories. A large number of survivors exist, with a large collections residing at the Historic Aircraft Restoration Museum at Dauster Field, Creve Coeur, near St Louis, and the Missouri and Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum in Hood River, Oregon.
The original Waco facility hangar in Troy, Ohio is now the headquarters of United Technologies Aerospace Systems - Landing Systems business unit. It manufactures wheels and brakes for aircraft. The Waco Air Museum (Wacoairmuseum.org) is located on Waco Field, a grass strip at the south edge of Troy, Ohio. The Museum has a collection of Wacos and the Aviation Learning Center.

Barry clearly has an intense interest in his Waco airplanes and has an extensive knowledge about Waco and models of Waco airplanes. He has a large library of drawings of Waco plans. Following his discussion and answering a number of questions the group walked over to Barry’s hangers to see both of his Waco’s.
As to his current project, Barry was looking for a challenge and found one in a 1932 model UBA. This airplane was one of the 22 side by side WACOs built. It was delivered with a removable top that was called the winter enclosure. His other Waco is a 1931 QCF-2. It is also beautiful and yearns to fly. Barry loaded us with numerous details and his experiences with both airplanes. He has a deep interest and knowledge about his and other Waco models and invites questions.

October 22, 2017 Meeting

Joel Marketello, a Paso Robles EAA Chapter 465 member volunteered to speak and share his experience and expertise concerning airplane maintenance. Joel’s United Airlines working career with aircraft inspection and maintenance made him a valuable resource for this program.

 

Hints for Homebilders videos at eaa.org